You need to upgrade your Flash Player The theme of this blog is not only and obviously space, but in particular “terrestrial worlds”, places that tend to have surfaces on which one could walk or at least attach oneself to. These places sometimes also have other earth-like familiar features such as atmospheres, weather, volcanos, geysers and perhaps, we are finding, even exotic oceans, rivers or lakes that are not necessarily made of familiar materials we are used to here at home. The second theme is imagery. Occasionally I do some retouching of images when needed if an image is incomplete or sometimes “dirty” or noisy. I will attempt to correct image shortcomings based upon other images or well-accepted presumed attributes. When this is done, notes will be offered as to what was added, why and sometimes how it was done. This way no one should ever wonder if something they are looking at is real or photoshop.

Archive for the 'Enceladus' Category

Enceladus has 101 Geysers

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Apparently there are a whole lot of geysers on Enceladus, more than 100. Well only one more, but there are sure to be others. Most of the geysers spotted so far appear along the four noticeably visible “tiger stripes” that appear in the southern hemisphere.

These are two of the most recent images to come from Cassini on this hot region of this medium sized moon. Nice seeing the detail on the geysers in the dark regions of the images where you can actually see where they are originating from on the surface.

Enceladus Lost in the Ring Haze

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

The tiny but very active moon Enceladus is seen here lost within the E-Ring of Saturn. The moon, as many of us know, is quite active with cryo-volcanic geysers littered throughout the ridges of the “tiger stripes” found mostly in the moon’s southern hemisphere. Since most of the ejecta from Enceladus is jettisoned fast enough to escape the tiny moon’s gravity, most the material winds up orbiting Saturn itself and is therefore helping over a very long period of time to form Saturn’s E-Ring. This at least partly helps solve the question of where Saturn’s massive ring structure originates.

Image by Val Klavans.

Around Saturn

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Around Saturn from fabio di donato on Vimeo.

Around Saturn from Fabio Di Donato on Vimeo.

In Saturn’s Rings Official Trailer

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013


The long awaited official trailer for “In Saturn’s Rings” has been unleashed. Looking forward to this film for over three years now.

Planetfall

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013

Having followed the activities of a small army of freelance space imagers that lurk in various places on the internet for about 10 years now — it is truly unusual for me to come across images that I know I have not seen before. Michael Benson’s exhibit titled, “Planetfall” at the American Association for the Advancement of Science offers offer fresh views from missions as old as Viking and as new as Cassini. What originally caught my attention was an image of an actively spewing Enceladus that is exposed in both Sun and Saturn shine — a view I have surely seen before, but never so detailed or dramatic. Even more surprising and rare is a new global composite view of Uranus with a complete and continuous ring taken by Voyager almost 30 years ago.

The show ends soon (June 28, 2013) and is located in Washington DC.

Outer Space Art Film Uses Only Raw Images

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

Outer Space from Sander van den Berg on Vimeo.

Best of G. Ugarkovic (Last 8 Months)

Saturday, November 17th, 2012

If you follow this blog on any basis, you might be well aware that a good percentage of the imagery is provided by our good flickr friend Gordan Ugarkovic. Here is a bit of what we missed from him in the last 10 months we were locked out.

Titan at the edge of Saturn taken 2011-05-21. Looks unreal. Like Titan was dropped into the scene using Photoshop. A sin I would never commit. See the lesser “official” NASA version released a few months back here.

Keeping with the theme of moons transiting Saturn. Here is Rhea and tiny Epimetheus doing what they do. Taken in 2010-03-24.

Finally, just to change it up… two moons against Titan, another of Saturn’s moons. Pictured above the Titanian cloud-tops is Dione on the left and Rhea on the right.

Saturn’s Five

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Space enthusiasts seem to really like shots that have more than one body in the same frame. How about five… or six (if you count the rings of Saturn)? Starting left to right that is Janus, Pandora, Enceladus, Mimas and Rhea.

Thanks again to Gordan Ugarkovic.

Enceladus in Saturnshine

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

Ian Regan’s composite of the recent Enceladus flyby. Best yet image I have seen of Enceladus lit both by sunshine and light reflected off Saturn (aka Saturnshine).

Also the Gordan Ugarkovic image. Note the spewing geysers on the lower left.

Best Color Image or Geysers on Enceladus

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

Geysers on Enceladus
Brought (as always) to us from Gordan Ugarkovic.

Saturn Cloudtops and The Fountains of Enceladus

Sunday, July 17th, 2011

Wow. That is quite a mutual event. Saturn crescent haze about as dramatic as it is ever seen by Cassini but with the addition of an active Enceladus hanging above at such a scale is quite unreal. Color by Gordan Ugarkovic.

Enceladus Sprays the Stars

Sunday, June 12th, 2011

Enceladus in Jan 2011

Taken in January of 2011 this raw image reveals Enceladus actively spraying the heavens from its southern geysers.

Mimas Wanders Into the Frame

Monday, December 27th, 2010

The Saturnian moon Mimas wanders into the frame of this shot which was primarily observing the active geysers on Enceladus.

The Plumes of Enceladus

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

Back and front lit plumes

This is the best lit image taken of the plumes of Enceladus thus far by Cassini. The moon is lit from the front by Saturnshine and the plumes are being back-lit by the Sun directly behind. A perfect alignment for revealing active geysers on a small moon.

Sometimes Raw Images are Enough

Friday, July 16th, 2010

Raw image of Enceladus

This image is taken directly from the Cassini raw images directory. Sometimes they are perfect with no need for adjustment or correction. The best detail is the subtle haze of the geysers spewing on the right edge. Taken April 26 from 987,839 kilometers away.