You need to upgrade your Flash Player The theme of this blog is not only and obviously space, but in particular “terrestrial worlds”, places that tend to have surfaces on which one could walk or at least attach oneself to. These places sometimes also have other earth-like familiar features such as atmospheres, weather, volcanos, geysers and perhaps, we are finding, even exotic oceans, rivers or lakes that are not necessarily made of familiar materials we are used to here at home. The second theme is imagery. Occasionally I do some retouching of images when needed if an image is incomplete or sometimes “dirty” or noisy. I will attempt to correct image shortcomings based upon other images or well-accepted presumed attributes. When this is done, notes will be offered as to what was added, why and sometimes how it was done. This way no one should ever wonder if something they are looking at is real or photoshop.

The Regan Saturn Portrait Extended Mix

Ian Regan Saturn Portrait

The one Saturn image that we keep coming back to at wanderingspace seems to be the Ian Regan portrait of Saturn. The composition, angle and color captured in the shot somehow seem to be better than any other. While there are a few other full Saturn images now available from the Cassini mission, none seem to have captured the drama that this one does. The angle that the ring shadows fall on Saturn’s disc, the phase that Saturn happened to be in at the time and the color available as the shot was taken from a more northern position. However, trying to apply the image to larger scale resolutions was not possible as the resolution in the orignal would require that the rings be extended to fill the frame on the left, right, bottom and potentially the top as well (I was also curious to see if the image was just as impressive if it was not angled and cropped as it is in the original). Extending the rings in one direction is easy enough, but doing it on all sides is near impossible to try to do in any image editing software such as Photoshop.

Ian Plus WS

Instead, a one pixel wide swash of the rings was sampled and turned into vectors using Adobe Illustrator. This further allows Illustrator to stretch and curve the ring information captured without having to worry about resolution or pixel distortion. The row of rings was then applied to a brush pattern and applied and wrapped to a simple circle shape. Now the rings are in full circle and the proportions are adjusted. That full set of rings was then rendered in 3-D software and the correct angle as well as perspective was applied and matched with the original Ian Regan image underneath the render for reference.

Regan and Wanderingspace Saturn Portrait

After that, all that is left to do is merge the Regan image to the rings (and maintain as much of the original image as possible) and artificially add the disc shadow that would fall upon the rings behind the planet iteself.

To see the image in hi-res use check out the 2560×1600 wallpaper sets for The Planets and Saturn Scenes

7 Responses to “The Regan Saturn Portrait Extended Mix”

  1. wanderingspace » Blog Archive » Saturnati XIX Says:

    [...] the way… this is still the best Saturn image ever [...]

  2. I Wander in Space | blog.choppingblock.com Says:

    [...] Cassini Mission. The second image of Saturn is that composite with a complete set of rings which I sampled from the image and rendered out in Adobe Illustrator (right). Don P Mitchell’s [...]

  3. Benjamin Edwards Says:

    I always use Adobe illustrator at work because i work in an animation studio. this is really a serious tool for the graphic artist.*;*

  4. Valeria Kelly Says:

    Adobe Illustrator has more features than its competitors “

  5. Wood Shelf  Says:

    in our office we use adobe illustrator very much’.”

  6. wanderingspace » Blog Archive » A New Work of Art Says:

    [...] Cassini shots with this one. The color composite was executed by Ian Regan who was the creator of another Cassini favorite here at [...]

  7. Melatonin %0B Says:

    Adobe illustrator has been the bread and butter software on our photostudio. can’t live without using it`                  

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